The Importance of Awards in the Hospitality Industry: A Balanced Perspective

Awards season is well and truly underway. With the Golden Globes, BAFTAs and Oscars all grabbing headlines at this time of year, it is an opportune moment to look at the impact awards can have on people strategy and overall business goals.  

Winning awards, receiving nominations or simply making a red-carpet splash can help shape reputations for years to come, drive business growth and set the bar for high standards.  

With awards bodies such as The Michelin Guide, Forbes Travel Guide, The Cateys and Hotel Cateys, the hospitality industry has a vibrant awards season which can have a significantly positive impact on hotels, restaurants, and the professionals within.  

However, like any system of recognition, there are considerations and the emotional, financial and time investment should be weighed up before committing to participate. 

In this article, we look through some of the details you may wish to consider before implementing an awards strategy. This could help you and your team make the right decisions for the future growth and development of your business, while continuing to prioritise your workplace culture.  

Michelin and Forbes: Setting Industry Standards 

The Michelin Guide and Forbes Travel Guide ratings are among the most coveted recognitions in the hospitality industry. They are awarded based on rigorous criteria that assess the quality of food, service, and overall guest experience. Inspectors do not announce their visits (either on arrival or departure) and the smallest details can have a significant impact on the rating. 

Benefits: 

  • Boost in Prestige and Business: Achieving such awards can significantly elevate a property’s status, attracting more guests and increasing revenue. A Michelin star, for instance, is not just a mark of culinary excellence but also a powerful marketing tool that can put a restaurant on the global map. 
  • Benchmark for Quality: These awards set very high standards, encouraging establishments to strive for excellence. They serve as a benchmark for quality, pushing the industry, and those in it, forward in terms of innovation, service, and culinary artistry. 
  • Establishing Trust: For guests and employees, these accolades are a mark of trust and quality assurance. When choosing where to dine, stay or work, awards from Michelin or Forbes can be decisive factors for those seeking high-end luxury experiences, or a workplace that aligns with their own values and ambitions. 

Considerations: 

  • Pressure and Stress: The pursuit of these awards can create immense pressure on owners and employees. The stress of maintaining standards for Michelin or Forbes evaluations can be intense, sometimes leading to a stressful work environment. 
  • Cost Implications: Striving for such high standards often comes with significant financial investment, which can be a challenge, especially for smaller, independent establishments. Many operators have argued that the higher revenues don’t necessarily lead to higher profit. 

Individual Awards: Recognising Personal Excellence 

Awards like the Cateys and Hotel Cateys celebrate the achievements of hospitality professionals, from chefs and managers to front-of-house teams. Entrants are nominated by peers and senior management and entries are submitted for judging by a panel of industry experts who volunteer their services. The ceremonies are often glitzy affairs in grand hotel ballrooms.  

Benefits: 

  • Career Advancement: Winning an individual award can be a significant boost to one’s career. It not only recognises talent but also opens doors to new opportunities, networking, and professional growth. From a recruitment perspective, there is no doubt that winning awards will raise an individual’s profile and attract attention from headhunters. 
  • Motivation and Morale: Such recognitions can greatly motivate staff, enhancing morale and fostering a sense of pride and accomplishment. They highlight the importance of individual contributions to the success of an establishment. 
  • Industry Benchmarking: These awards set benchmarks for individual excellence, inspiring others in the industry to strive for similar achievements. 

Considerations: 

  • Subjectivity: Unlike awards based on specific criteria and mystery guest visits, individual awards are often based on a written application, which can be more subjective, sometimes leading to debates over the deservingness of winners. 
  • Overemphasis on Recognition: There’s a risk that the pursuit of awards might overshadow other important aspects of the job, such as teamwork and guest satisfaction. 
  • Limited Recognition: With so many deserving candidates in the industry, individual awards can only recognise a few, potentially leading to feelings of undervaluation among others. 

Awards in the hospitality industry, whether for establishments or individuals, have a profound impact. They drive competition, encourage excellence, and provide a framework for what constitutes high-end service. For consumers, these awards simplify choices, offering a guide to exceptional experiences. 

However, it’s crucial for the industry to balance the pursuit of awards with the overall well-being of employees and the financial health of the establishment. The pressure to maintain or achieve these accolades should not come at the cost of employee well-being or lead to unsustainable business practices. 

Moreover, while awards are important, they are not the sole measure of success. Many outstanding establishments and professionals thrive without them, focusing on delivering exceptional experiences that resonate with their guests. Ultimately, the true measure of success in hospitality lies in the satisfaction and loyalty of guests, and the fulfillment and well-being of the staff who make those experiences possible. 

If you would like to chat to us about giving your people strategy the red carpet treatment, then get in touch on +44 20 8600 1166.  

Success Stories – In Conversation with Guy Lean, Managing Director at Madison Mayfair

This year, Guy Lean is celebrating his 20th anniversary at Madison Mayfair and, as such a stalwart hospitality industry, we thought who better to kick off our 2024 Success Story series. 

Having studied recreational management in college, Guy’s journey into recruitment was not a conventional one. His early experience at Royal Mid-Surrey Golf Club led to his first role in recruitment where he quickly realised the importance of nurturing personal connections as he carved his career path through sales, training and recruitment, with some help from Dr Seuss along the way. 

At Madison Mayfair, Guy’s focus goes beyond merely placing candidates in roles, but rather measured by their long-term achievements of these placements, underlining Guy’s commitment to nurturing meaningful and lasting relationships for both his candidates and clients alike. 

In this interview, Guy shares his rich experiences, insights, and perspectives on the recruitment landscape, offering valuable advice and observations that stem from a career built on genuine connections and a deep understanding of the industry.

Please tell us more about your career path and how you become known as one of the best-connected recruiters in the hospitality industry. 

Recruitment isn’t really one of those careers that you study in college and then start head-hunting. Like many of my peers, I fell into it somewhat. After finishing my studies in recreational management, with the initial goal of managing a leisure centre, I found myself at The Royal Mid-Surrey Golf Club in Richmond. There, I was not only involved in selling events but also managed the bars and looked after the events themselves. This was my first real exposure to high-quality hospitality and the art of connecting with people on a daily basis. 

While at the golf club, a member noticed my potential and asked what my future plans were. He offered me a job at his recruitment firm back in my hometown, Cambridge. I started placing salespeople in various industries including agricultural machinery and pharmaceuticals, working with anybody that sold anything across East Anglia. This job was a real ‘school of hard knocks.’ It involved picking up the phone hundreds of times a day, making connections and really understanding sales.  

I then moved to work for a pharmaceutical recruiter, specialising in the niche area of tamper-evident packaging. This was a significant step in my career, as I eventually became the number one recruiter in the US, while still based in Europe. This led to me being headhunted by Humana International to help sell franchises and teach franchisees to become head-hunters in their respective fields. Humana was eventually sold to an even bigger company called MRI and I became their Global Head of Training while also out there selling franchises. 

Mentorship played a crucial role in my career development. I was fortunate to work with and learn from prominent figures in the recruitment industry, like Tony Byrne and Steven Finkel. These experiences not only shaped my skills but also instilled in me the importance of mentoring others. I’ve trained and hired many individuals over the years and take pride in seeing them achieve great success in their careers.  

In recruitment, statistics play a significant role, even though it’s very much a human-centered field. It takes about 75 conversations to find the right person for a job, someone who would truly excel in their role.  

Our approach at Madison Mayfair involves understanding and connecting with a vast network of people – around six and a half thousand in each market. These individuals are not just clients or candidates, but they are all people with unique needs and aspirations. We are proud to say that most of the clients we work with have been candidates in the past.

Can you share your top tips for candidate who might be preparing for interviews in 2024. 

I’ve always said that when we’re interviewing, we’re all in sales. Regardless of what role you might be applying for, and whoever you are in front of, you’re selling.  

I think you have to follow a sales process and preparation is everything. I would suggest reading a sales book and my top recommendation is “Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss which gets to the essence of sales faster than any other book.  

From there, researching the company and having excellent questions are great ways to build rapport. Technically, most candidates who get to interview stage could probably do the job, but in most cases, it’s the most enthusiastic person who gets it.

Are there any industry technologies that you are excited to see continue to develop. Conversely, are there any industry technologies you would prefer never to see again? 

I believe that certain technologies, particularly those aiding in research and networking, are incredibly beneficial. LinkedIn, for instance, has significantly transformed the recruitment landscape. Its ability to facilitate connections and provide instant access to individuals’ backgrounds is invaluable. This tool is essential in our industry, to the extent that if someone isn’t present on LinkedIn, they might not even be considered a viable candidate. 

In terms of communication preferences, I’ve noticed a generational shift. Younger individuals often prefer text messages or platforms like WhatsApp over traditional emails or phone calls. These tools have been effective in connecting with people in ways they are more comfortable with. 

However, there’s a downside to technology when it oversteps and replaces human interaction. In our industry, which is very personal and deals with people’s careers and lives, losing the human touch can be detrimental. For example, when companies provide feedback or rejection via email, it can feel impersonal and inadequate. Human connections are vital, and technology should not overshadow them. 

While I am relatively new to AI and its applications, I can see its potential, especially in speeding up processes like research and initial connections. It’s a remarkable tool for gathering information and bringing back relevant findings quickly. However, the recruitment process in hospitality still requires a balance. While technology can expedite certain aspects, the final stages of interviewing and truly understanding what people want and need must be done through direct human interaction, either face-to-face or via video conferencing. This balance ensures that while we embrace the advantages of technology, we do not lose the essence of personal connections that are fundamental to the hospitality industry. 

Business travel is getting closer to pre-pandemic levels of spend, but many analysts, feel that it will never be the same. Do you feel that candidate expectations have changed regarding travelling for business? 

I believe there are two main elements to consider. Firstly, there’s a heightened focus on the carbon footprint. People have become more environmentally conscious than ever before, and a genuine shift in focus towards sustainability is influencing decisions to travel less. 

Secondly, the importance of maintaining relationships plays a significant role. While the pandemic demonstrated the effectiveness of video conferencing for meetings, which had not been widely popular before, certain aspects of business, such as the MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, and Exhibitions) market, team building, and relationship building, still necessitate physical travel. In these areas, face-to-face interactions are essential and irreplaceable. 

An interesting observation I’ve made is that fewer people are now relocating for work post-pandemic. There seems to be a change in mindset where individuals are more content to stay in their area, seeking a different balance in life and work. This contrasts with the previous norm, especially among general managers in hospitality, where career advancement often meant travelling globally to gain diverse experiences. Now, many seem more satisfied with remaining in their local area. 

However, this shift in perspective towards travel and relocation seems to vary between generations. For instance, I’ve noticed that younger generations, like my two sons in their early 20s, are driven by experiences and the desire to travel. They work hard and then use their earnings to travel extensively. This love for experiences and exploring the world seems more pronounced among them, whereas the older generation appears less driven to relocate or travel extensively for work purposes. 

What do you feel are the most important traits for hospitality leaders to demonstrate? 

For me, the most important traits for high-level leaders centres around emotional intelligence. Leaders who exhibit high emotional intelligence can better communicate with their team, providing information effectively and motivating their teams while displaying empathy and impeccable social skills.  

The most successful leaders generally display a strong self-awareness of their own emotions that helps them understand that people often leave jobs due to poor relationships with their supervisors or a lack of connection with the leadership. They can create work environments where employees feel valued, understood, and motivated, leading to better retention and a more positive workplace culture. It’s not always about monetary compensation but more often about the quality of the work environment and the relationships within it. 

What do you feel has been your biggest achievement and why?

I’ve placed over a thousand people in their careers, many of whom have risen from their first jobs to C-level positions but I feel my biggest achievement has been my work with people and teams. I’ve had the incredible fortune of working with extremely talented individuals throughout my career, and the amount I’ve learned from these experiences has been immense.  

At Madison Mayfair, we have a unique focus: we aim to ensure a return on investment for the candidates we place. Our measure of success isn’t just about filling positions. We look at their progress after 12 months. We follow up to see if they were promoted, if they hit their KPIs, met their targets, or received bonuses. I’m particularly proud of this aspect because it signifies that we’re genuinely contributing to the career growth and success of individuals and our clients’ businesses. 

I am also very proud of the reputation and regard Madison Mayfair has earned in the marketplace. We’re a boutique firm and take pride in the quality of our work and the lasting relationships we build.  

Often, candidates come back to us as clients, and companies return to us for our services, which is a testament to the effectiveness of our approach. Just recently, I had a conversation with someone who had been with a company for six years and reached out to us because of our longstanding work with them.  

This kind of feedback and repeat collaboration reinforce that we’re doing something right. I’m extremely grateful for the great teams we have and the collaborative efforts that contribute to these successes. 

What is the best piece of advice you have been given on your career journey?

I think the best bit of advice I’ve ever been given is, “put your brain into gear before you put your mouth into motion.” 

Madison Mayfair focuses on forging strong, long-standing relationships with clients and candidates, often over the lifetime of multiple roles, to ensure we can find creative and innovative solutions to the challenges we all face in the hospitality industry.  

 To discuss how we can support your businesses with your overall people strategy or to access our full suite of human capital services through Hospitality People Group, please get in touch with Guy Lean on Tel: +44 20 8600 1180,  Mob:+44 7813 009787 or Email: guylean@madisonmayfair.com  

2023: A Year in Review and the Road Ahead

With just a few weeks left in 2023, it’s an opportune moment to reflect on a year that has been as challenging as it has been rewarding for the hospitality sector.  

This year, the hospitality industry has continued to demonstrate resilience, adaptability, and a commitment to excellence that has helped to build confidence amongst operators, owners and investors.  

The team at Hospitality People Group, including Madison Mayfair, FM Recruitment and HPG Advisory Services are proud to have worked alongside our clients to navigate this evolving landscape. This experience, together with a commitment to share ideas and continuously learn from industry specialists around the world, has given us a unique perspective to share insights to help support our clients’ with their people strategies.  

Our team travelled more this year and attended conferences including IHIF in Berlin, FHS in Abu Dhabi and AHC in Manchester. With an even more bustling travel diary for 2024, we have a front-row seat to the vibrant world of hospitality. 

The Battle for Retention
One of the most pressing issues this year has been the ongoing battle for talent. The hospitality industry, known for its high turnover rates, has faced an unprecedented challenge over the past few years. The impact of a demographic shift, with nearly half a million less 18 year olds than 10 years ago, was exacerbated by the impact of Brexit and the pandemic. In a time where recruitment is far more challenging, there has been a renewed focus on retention in order to manage employee turnover. The key to this success has been in promoting stronger workplace cultures and recognising that our employees are a far more valuable part of what we offer guests than may have been previously considered. Innovative strategies, including enhanced development programs, competitive compensation packages, and a focus on workplace culture, have been pivotal. When we invest in our people, they, in turn, invest their loyalty and passion in our services. 

Success Stories
While we are keen to support our clients and their retention strategies, our core business has always revolved around executive search and we work closely with our long-standing clients and a network of candidates to find ideal matches for available roles. This year we were delighted that some of the candidates we placed took time out of their busy schedules to be interviewed in our Success Stories series. Imran Bhatia, Claire Llewellin-Davis and Natasha Eldred all joined us in conversation to discuss their achievements, inspirations and challenges, as well as to share tips and insights for those who might be considering a career in hospitality. 

AI’s Role in Hospitality
The influence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been felt across most industries in 2023, and hospitality is no different. While talk about the Metaverse has diminished due to setbacks from major companies like Meta and Disney, AI has gained significant traction, becoming more integrated into everyday technology. AI’s potential in the hospitality industry lies in automating routine tasks, thereby enhancing efficiency and allowing employees to focus on more value-adding strategic and/or guest-facing roles.  

This shift may go on to change the nature of the skills and roles required in the industry. In recruitment, AI can streamline processes, reduce bias, and improve candidate engagement, although concerns about AI’s potential to overlook valuable candidates remain. Despite AI’s advancements, we believe that it will not replace human consultants but rather augment their capabilities, allowing them to concentrate on relationship-building, retention, and culture, thereby adding more value to businesses and candidates. 

Hotel Investment Trends
The Hospitality People Group team attended a number of hotel investment events throughout 2023 and discovered a number of key themes that ran through them all. The luxury hospitality sector in particular, is experiencing a robust and continuing recovery. Despite the impact of inflation, by focusing on personalised and exclusive experiences to meet the evolving demands of luxury travellers, hotels have been better able to enhance guest satisfaction in this segment, while raising average rates.  

Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) considerations have continued to grow more central to the industry and are driven by increasing consumer demand for sustainable practices and a willingness from hotel investors to future-proof their investments in the long term. The integration of ESG strategies into operations is evident, though challenges remain in aligning consumer expectations with their willingness to pay for these practices. A recent article from Hospitality Investor also pointed to the increasing risk presented by climate change, but we also learnt that some regions are also using it as an opportunity to extend the summer season.  

We have also seen some diversification of the leisure hospitality investments, moving beyond traditional models such as beach and golf resorts to include more varied offerings like wellness retreats and Alpine resorts. This trend highlights a broader investor interest in more sustainable, long-term leisure assets. 

Despite challenges in the hotel transaction market and financing landscape, including the gap between seller expectations and buyer capabilities, there remains optimism about the market’s resilience and potential for growth. These trends collectively signal a dynamic phase of innovation and opportunity in the hospitality sector. 

The Evolution of Hotel Asset Management
As the hotel investment scene has developed, the role of the Hotel Asset Manager has become essential, serving as a critical link between investors, owners, and operators. In 2023, this position became central to maximising profitability and operational efficiency, while enhancing guest experience and optimising the return on investment. This comes at a time for hotel investment, when investor interest is peaked by industry recovery, yet continues to be mindful of the recent challenges the sector has faced.  

Hotel Asset Managers are instrumental in driving financial performance, identifying revenue opportunities, and implementing strategies to safeguard profits in a competitive market. They play a key role in risk management and investment strategy, evaluating market conditions to inform investment decisions and risk mitigation. Additionally, they focus on operational efficiency and quality assurance, ensuring the hotel meets evolving guest expectations and maintains high service standards. Together, this reflects a shift from traditional owner-manager dynamics to a more specialised, strategic approach, designed to appeal to the market. 

Looking Ahead: 2024
We look forward towards 2024 with excitement. With plans to attend events in Berlin, Florida, Riyadh, New York, Dubai, Rome, Manchester, and London, we are committed to staying at the forefront of industry trends and innovations. These events are not just opportunities for learning and networking but also a testament to our dedication to supporting and connecting the hospitality world. 

The challenges we have faced in this industry over the last few years have only strengthened our commitment with a renewed sense of purpose and a clear vision for the future – where we can help support people strategies that align seamlessly with our client’s business goals. 

Here’s to a new year filled with more travels, learnings, and opportunities to redefine the essence of hospitality. 

If you would like to have a chat about your people strategy for 2024 and beyond, please get in touch on Tel: +44 20 8600 1166.  

The Middle East’s Undimmed Investment Lure: Future Hospitality Summit 2023 in Abu Dhabi with Andrea Shaw and Tairona Lattanzi

Last week, Andrea Shaw and Tairona Lattanzi attended the Future Hospitality Summit (FHS) in Abu Dhabi, which attracted industry professionals from around the world to explore, discuss, and decipher the current status and forward trajectory of the hospitality sector in the Middle East. Here, Andrea shares her comprehensive insights and experiences from the summit, providing a nuanced look at the opportunities, challenges, and emergent trends in the industry. 

Investment Landscape
Contrary to the whispers at the International Hotel Investment Forum (IHIF) earlier this year that suggested that investment opportunities in the Middle East were reaching a plateau, this event hinted at a far from exhausted investment landscape there. Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi have all accelerated their ambitions in recent years, but we found that this event had a considerable focus on Dubai and how it has astutely steered itself to hold substantial weight in the global hospitality industry, luring investors with its infrastructural marvels, technological advancements, and dynamic customer base. In particular, the Russian and Chinese markets are being eyed as potential catalysts for sustained investment. 

Russian and Chinese Investment
As the global ramifications of the war in Ukraine continue, Russian investors and tourists are tending to spend considerably longer in the region. A strong relationship seems to be budding between Russian nationals and the Dubai hospitality sector, signalling a niche for tailored services and more authentic experiences. By understanding their preferences, spending habits, and cultural nuances to craft offerings that seamlessly align with their expectations, the hospitality industry in the region can maximise profits in a market that holds an uncertain future. 

Touted as a colossal market with untapped potential, the Chinese traveller stands on the cusp of being a significant player in Middle Eastern hospitality. While a large section of the market is yet to re-embrace travel after the pandemic, there is a significant expectation that this will happen soon, and hospitality operators are eager to make preparations for it yet cautious enough to protect costs and cash flow in the meantime. Again, understanding their buying behaviours, shopping habits, and technological usage (like their predilection for platforms like WeChat and Weibo) will be vital to winning market share. Tailoring marketing strategies and operational aspects to accommodate and attract this segment could pave the way for a torrent of opportunities in the not too distant future. 

Sustainability 
A discernible thread through the summit was the heightened emphasis on sustainability. Dialogue with investors underscored the imperative of embedding eco-friendly practises into the very early stages of planning and construction. The financial and operational challenges of retrofitted adaptations seem to be rather easier to negate in the Middle East, with a stronger new build culture than they might be in other parts of the world. While sustainability was being pushed as a key theme during the event, the buy-in from attendees was sometimes disappointing given the low turnout at these sessions. 

With authenticity playing such an important role in appealing to customers, it seems clear that a robust and transparent environment, sustainability, and governance strategies will be crucial in appealing to both internal and external audiences. Branded hotels now tend to include operational standards to address basic ESG requirements that appeal to third party booking platforms, including corporate booking partners, and this could add to the appeal of branded hotels, which we will discuss in further detail below. You can also read more on the key role ESG can play in recruitment and employee retention, which Hospitality People Group published recently. 

Food and Beverage Conundrum
With the Global Restaurant Investment Forum (GRIF) taking place on the first day of FHS, the food and beverage domain garnered unanimous attention. An interesting debate that peppered the sessions concerned the question of how food and beverage outlets should be managed. While some advocated for the inclusion of celebrity chefs and high-profile names, others veered towards third-party management or even in-house handling of F&B. The strategic choice in this regard can significantly mould the guest experience and brand positioning in the hyper-competitive market, but the general consensus was that there was no consensus, which suggests that any of these management strategies can be successfully implemented in the right circumstances. Unfortunately, this also suggests that any of these can fail when the conditions aren’t suitable. 

Brand vs. Independent
In a similar vein to the question of how best to manage food and beverage outlets, the summit raised the topic of affiliating with established brands or steering through the market as independent entities. The Middle East, with its penchant for brand recognition and associated prestige, seemingly tilts the balance in favour of brand affiliations. However, there’s a sprouting of independent hotels, no doubt hoping to appeal to the growing trend for unique and authentic experiences, and they seem keen to challenge this assumption. There didn’t seem to be any evidence so far to measure the impact of this, but with so many large hotel operators with newer brands that offer the best of both worlds (e.g., Marriott’s Autograph Collection or Hilton’s Curio Collection), we may see this develop over the next few years. 

Conclusion
Andrea and Tairona’s time at the Future Hospitality Summit was a journey through a landscape of ideas, opportunities, and genuine connections. The spirit of the region, ever-resilient and ambitious, continues to embrace the global challenges in the hospitality industry, and this event will continue to linger in the minds and strategies of those hospitality professionals, operators, owners, and potential investors who attended. 

If you would like to discuss any of the topics that have been discussed here or any other elements of your people strategy, then please do not hesitate to contact Andrea Shaw at  andreashaw@fmrecruitment.co.uk or on +44 20 8600 1160. 

Success Stories – In Conversation with Claire Llewellin-Davis

With a diverse background spanning prestigious international establishments such as The Hurlingham ClubThe Hong Kong Jockey Club and now as Managing Director of The Lensbury, Claire Llewellin-Davis’ journey has been impressive.

Her expertise extends far beyond the confines of luxury hospitality, having previously served in Iraq and Afghanistan in her distinguished eight years as a British Army Officer. This unique blend of experiences has shaped Claire into a dynamic leader, well-equipped to inspire change and set new standards of excellence at every level.  

The Lensbury
Founded in 1920, The Lensbury is set within 25 beautiful acres, bordering the River Thames, and comprises a 155-bedroom hotel, a private members’ club with 7,000 members, a conference centre, state of the art gym, studios, an indoor pool, spa, 24 tennis courts, squash courts, water sports centre and elite sports facilities supported by a heavy weights gym and 2 UEFA pitches. 

Claire commenced her role as Managing Director at The Lensbury just days before England’s Lionesses checked in to begin their successful run at Euro 2022. It resulted in Wembley glory and a team victory celebration hosted at The Lensbury, the likes of which hadn’t been seen in England since 1966. 

We had the pleasure of catching up with Claire for a fascinating chat, where she shared her invaluable insights on the world of hospitality within both Club management and the Hotel Industry. 

Transitioning from a successful career in the British Army to the world of hospitality is an impressive achievement. How has your military background influenced your approach to leadership in the hospitality industry, and what valuable lessons have you carried forward from your time in the armed forces?
A career in the military provides an excellent grounding for all walks of life, and the path to Club Management is increasingly common. I loved my time in the Army, and credit it for honing a number of transferable skills and lessons for future success:   

  • The importance of teamwork and developing a strong camaraderie; there is no leadership without followership 
  • The power of communication; this sets the foundation for success at all levels
  • The necessity for ongoing personal and team development, ‘train hard, fight easy’ 
  • To set, embody and maintain high standards; to ‘be the best’ 
  • To set priorities and manage time 
  • Resilience: the confidence and strength to tackle the unknown 

In your opinion, what are the key factors that contribute to creating a strong and cohesive team culture within a hospitality organisation?
Communication is key. The majority of people set out to do a good job. It is our responsibility as managers and leaders to help them deliver it. We have to put in place the structure and support necessary for our team to understand what their role is, what the future of the business is, and to see how they play their part within it. We must encourage and reward success. The workplace should be an enjoyable place to be, where engagement, recognition, reward and support are part of daily life. Happy staff = Happy customers.  

As a seasoned hospitality leader, what do you believe sets apart truly exceptional service from the rest?
The key to exceptional service is anticipation. Understanding what someone wants, before they know it themselves. 

As an experienced Club Manager, now benefiting from an insight into the world of Hotel Management, what have your observations been?
It has been a fascinating, and hugely rewarding experience. There is so much that Club Management can learn from the Hotel Industry and vice versa. Whilst equity Clubs are ‘surplus’, rather than ‘profit driven’, there is much to be said for the hotel industry’s laser focus on revenue and profitability at department and GOP level. Data driven decision-making is powerful. 

Technology has revolutionised the way we experience hospitality. How do you strike a balance between leveraging technology to enhance guest experiences while still maintaining a personal touch?
The word ‘balance’ is key between automation, and maintaining a human connection, which will always be irreplaceable. Automation is great when there is little complexity; as the military would say, Keep It Simple, Stupid. With escalating costs, we are all looking at ways we can reduce our overheads. Ultimately technology that will enhance the guest experience, whilst providing a better understanding of their journey and drive revenue, is what we are all looking to invest in.   

What advice would you give to aspiring hospitality professionals who aspire to reach leadership positions within the industry?
Believe in yourself and be clear about the kind of organisations you want to work for and why. Continue to develop yourself and obtain professional qualifications which will set you apart from the rest. Don’t be afraid to take the odd ‘detour’ if you can see that it will provide you with additional, relevant skills in the future. Attitude is everything.  Good luck! 

Madison Mayfair focuses on forging strong, long-standing relationships with clients and candidates, often over the lifetime of multiple roles, to ensure we can find creative and innovative solutions to the challenges we all face in the hospitality industry. 

To discuss how we can support your businesses with your overall people strategy or to access our full suite of human capital services through Hospitality People Group, please get in touch with Guy Lean on Tel: +44 20 8600 1180,  Mob:+44 7813 009787 or Email guylean@madisonmayfair.com 

Will AI replace human hospitality recruiters?

Last year, the Metaverse was touted as the future of business. While that might certainly be the case at some point in the future, it feels that the enthusiasm for this project has waned.  

The technology needed to experience Web 3.0 is still unfamiliar to many, but more importantly, there has been a huge backtrack in recent months from innovators such as Meta and Disney, as they have dramatically reduced their workforces dedicated to this sector. 

On the other hand, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is growing in influence. We are familiar with AI through popular culture, and Hollywood movies have often highlighted the advantages and disadvantages very clearly, and often, dramatically!  

Since Chat GPT was launched in November 2022, we have seen a sudden deluge of AI add-ons and features added to familiar websites, search engines, and productivity programmes. Devices we already own, suddenly have the ability to leverage the power of advanced AI…. for free. 

There is no doubt that AI is disrupting the way we work, live and interact. Like all advancements, it has the potential to create both new opportunities and challenges for various sectors, and the hospitality industry is no different.  

But what impact is this technology likely to have on recruitment in the hospitality industry? 

Hospitality Skills
Before we look at how AI could affect recruitment, it is important to ask if AI might make a difference in the type of roles or skills that may become more sought after in future.  

AI can enhance the efficiency and accuracy of many jobs across the sector by automating repetitive and routine tasks, such as data entry, reconciliation, invoicing and payments.  

This can free up time and resources for employees to focus on more strategic and innovative activities. This could help hospitality professionals to generate new insights and recommendations, identify new opportunities and trends, and create new products and services. 

While the reduction of manual tasks may certainly affect the number of employees required, it may also help augment the skills and capabilities of employees to help them to deliver more value for their businesses and guests. This would require the industry to continue to adapt and evolve roles and responsibilities and acquire new skills and competencies to leverage the power of these technological advancements. 

Recruitment
We know that finding and hiring perfect candidates for hospitality roles is a challenging and time-consuming process. AI will certainly be able to help streamline and improve certain recruitment processes including: 

  • The screening and shortlisting of candidates based on their resumes, skills, qualifications and experience. AI could help save recruiters time and effort and reduce human bias and errors 
  • Providing personalised and timely communication, feedback and guidance throughout the recruitment journey. This can increase candidate engagement and satisfaction, and improve the employer brand 
  • Providing insights and recommendations for recruiters and hiring managers. This can help them make better and faster decisions, optimise their strategies, and identify talent gaps and opportunities. 
  • Helping candidates find and apply for roles that match their preferences, goals and potential. This can increase the quality and diversity of the talent pool, and reduce the turnover rate. 

Understanding Bias in AI  
A 2021 Forbes article, Understanding Bias in AI Enabled Hiring, it was highlighted how AI objectively assesses the data points and reduces assumptions, mental fatigue and bias that humans often succumb to.  

While there is a risk of human bias being subconsciously programmed into the AI algorithm, there are still clear advantages to relying on AI to screen candidates on a large scale.  

In 2019, a Harvard Business Review article, Will AI reduce Gender Bias in Hiring, it highlighted that AI does not need to engage in unconscious biases to penalise based on gender or other under-represented groups in order to get a self-esteem boost. 

Reducing human bias is undoubtedly a fairer solution, but this lack of bias could also be a significant drawback to AI-based recruitment.  If a business wanted to diversify its workforce or business culture, recruitment without any human judgement may not serve the purpose.  

There are candidates out there with atypical work experiences that fail to meet the AI algorithm standards, who could potentially be the best fit in terms of their individual personality, interests, character and work ethics. 

Our Conclusion
As specialists in people strategy, we recognise that our view comes from a position of bias, but we strongly feel that AI will never replace our consultants. It will likely become a powerful tool that can augment our capabilities and performance, by helping reduce mundane tasks. This will allow us to focus on the human aspects of people and performance strategies, such as building relationships, focussing on retention and culture, and providing added value to businesses and candidates. 

If you would like to have a chat about your people strategy, please get in touch and we can chat – human to human – on Tel: +44 20 8600 1166. 

Success Stories – In Conversation with Natsha Eldred

Established in 2011, EQ Hotels is a leading European hospitality investment and management platform with over €1.7B of hotel real estate across 5,000 rooms. 

EQ Hotel’s quality discipline coupled with entrepreneurial, hands-on operational management, enables them to identify and execute niche, high-value-add real estate opportunities in the hotel investment market. EQ Hotel’s unique position, as both an investor and manager, allows it to underwrite acquisitions balancing solid return on investment targets with operationally credible roadmaps to achieve goals. 

In early 2022, EQ Hotels engaged Madison Mayfair to support the development of its people strategy. After identifying the need to support not just overall marketing goals for the business, it became clear that there was an immediate need to support the high-profile opening of a luxury five-star property in Paris, Hotel Dame Des Arts. With this, Madison Mayfair adapted the executive search parameters to include robust luxury, pre-opening experience that could be deployed quickly and initially on a short-term contract to have a big impact with limited risk.  

Natasha Eldred had recently moved back to the UK having spent nearly 20 years running her own luxury hospitality PR agency in south-east Asia, from her base of operations in Thailand. She had supported the launch of some of the biggest luxury properties in the region and was perfectly placed to lead the PR element of this pre-opening, on a fixed-term project basis. 

By late 2022, with the pre-opening underway with Natasha’s expertise in place, we further enhanced the marketing team structure by recruiting a full time Director of Marketing.  With her previous experience in multi-property luxury brands, we were delighted to place Carla Severn, an ideal match for EQ Hotels as they continue to grow their luxury portfolio in London and Paris. 

As part of our ‘In Conversation” series, we were delighted to recently catch up with Natasha for a short Q & A as she shares her thoughts on her extensive experience in the hospitality industry. 

What inspired you to follow a career in hospitality?
My passion and professional background in the performing arts led me to pursue a career in hospitality. The similarities between hotels and theatre are striking – both involve creating a captivating experience for the audience or guest. Hotels are like a stage or a film set, with the operations team and guests playing important roles in the narrative. Just as actors create characters, hotel professionals use branding and marketing to communicate with guests and create engaging experiences. I particularly enjoy the thrill of opening a new hotel – it’s like the excitement of a new relationship. As someone who works primarily on pre and grand-opening projects, I get to experience the buzz and then exit stage left while the hotel is at its peak. 

What do you consider your biggest achievement so far and why? 
While relocating back to the UK after being overseas for two decades was a significant personal achievement, my greatest professional accomplishment was leading the global launch of Keemala, a breathtaking resort tucked in the hillside of Phuket’s west coast. This project was particularly special to me because I had the opportunity to work closely with the owning family from the very beginning and was given full autonomy to oversee everything from the brand story to the PR strategy, social media, photography direction, and even the food and beverage offerings. Taking a 360-degree approach to this project allowed me to immerse myself fully in every aspect, and it was this level of involvement that I truly enjoyed. Overall, I consider my work on the Keemala launch to be my greatest achievement, as it was a project that felt deeply personal and allowed me to showcase my skills across multiple areas. 

What does great hospitality mean to you?
To me, great hospitality is all about creating a sense of warmth and genuine welcome for every guest. While I certainly appreciate luxury and all the frills that come with it, I believe that the key to exceptional hospitality lies in the quality of the team. Hospitality is not just about providing top-notch service, but also about selling experiences and journeys that enrich the lives of guests. As a hospitality communications professional, I see myself as an ambassador for both the hotel and the destination it represents, sharing the story and values of both and ensuring that we shine the brightest light on both.  

What is the greatest lesson you have learned in your career so far?
I have learned that continuous learning is essential, but it’s equally important to focus on my strengths. It’s easy to underestimate the value of experience and the distinctive perspective it brings to a team. As professionals, and consultants, it’s common to feel like an imposter or hesitate to charge a fair fee, but with decades of experience, I must remind myself that am worth every penny. Additionally, I have learned not to get caught up in small details and to have the courage to redirect clients towards what really matters. It’s easy to get bogged down in irrelevant aspects, but this can be a waste of time and resources. Instead, it’s crucial to stay focused on the big picture and work towards achieving meaningful outcomes. 

Thank you to Natasha for sharing your inspirational views on the hospitality industry.  

Madison Mayfair focuses on forging strong, long-standing relationships with clients and candidates, often over the lifetime of multiple roles, to ensure we can find creative and innovative solutions to the challenges we all face in the hospitality industry. 

To discuss how we can support your businesses with your overall people strategy or to access our full suite of human capital services through Hospitality People Group, please get in touch with Guy Lean on Tel: +44 20 8600 1180, Mob: +44 7813 009787 or Email: guylean@madisonmayfair.com  

IHIF 2023: Key Highlights and Insights Shaping the Hospitality Industry

The International Hospitality Investment Forum (IHIF) 2023 recently concluded with the theme “Fortune Favours the Bold”. This year’s event brought together a diverse group of industry leaders and experts to discuss the latest trends, challenges and opportunities in the dynamic world of hospitality. Here, Hospitality People Group’s Dan Akhtar and Mara Cattaneo share their highlights and key insights that continue to shape the hospitality landscape. 

The Battle to Attract & Retain
Earlier this year Hospitality People Group published an article on The Battle for Retention, that spotlighted the challenges that the hospitality industry continues to face, so it was no surprise that this topic took centre stage in Berlin. Jan Hein Simons, Hotels Director at Colliers specifically highlighted labour shortages as the major industry challenge, and said that “some companies had been turning down revenue because of a lack of staff.” Participants explored the increasing competition to attract and retain skilled professionals in an ever-evolving job market. As the industry faces a growing demand for talent, strategies and initiatives were shared to address this challenge. These included innovative recruitment practices, talent development programs, and creating a positive work culture to attract and retain the best talent available.  

Focus on Luxury
We found that there was huge optimism for the ongoing recovery of the luxury hospitality sector. The event shed light on the evolving expectations of luxury travellers and the growing demand for personalised and exclusive experiences. Concepts such as hyper-personalisation, unique amenities, and curated experiences were discussed as key drivers to enhance guest satisfaction in this segment. While the labour shortage has certainly affected the luxury segment’s ability to fill hotels, they have also been far more successful in passing increased room rate onto their guests than midscale properties, leading to ADRs that are already well ahead of 2019. The integration of cutting-edge technology and partnerships with luxury brands were also highlighted as strategies to provide unforgettable and personalised luxury experiences. 

ESG Goes Mainstream
The development of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) considerations from a niche subject to centre stage at IHIF 2023 is remarkable. It clearly signals a willingness to shift towards more sustainable and responsible practices in the hospitality industry, driven by increasing consumer demand and regulatory requirements. However, it is still not clear that what consumers demand, and what they are willing to pay for are quite the same. Attendees discussed how governmental policy would likely drive the implementation of ESG strategies, including energy efficiency programs, waste reduction strategies, community engagement, and ethical sourcing. Overall, establishing your company’s values and beliefs and clearly communicating them with potential employees as well as customers seemed to be a growing trend and excellent advice to businesses looking to grow, attract investment and/or win the battle for retention. 

Subdued Hotel Transaction Market
From our experience at IHIF, there is usually a news ticker sharing updates on the various deals that have been struck during the week. This was noticeably absent this year and points to a hotel transaction market that remains subdued, with a gap between seller expectations and buyer financing capabilities. While it seems clear that there is capital available, rising seller expectations and the subsequent lack of distressed assets, coupled with the increased cost of debt have made financing a challenge for potential buyers. Despite the challenges, participants expressed great optimism about the market’s resilience and the potential for future growth. 

Financing Challenges
Participants highlighted the increased cost, and reduced accessibility of debt financing in the hospitality industry. However, it was noted that lenders are still open to financing projects that demonstrate institutional appeal and align with their investment criteria. Factors such as sustainable themes, commitment to the hospitality sector, and desirable locations were identified as crucial elements in securing financing for hospitality projects. Alternative financing options, such as private equity and crowdfunding, were also explored as viable alternatives to traditional debt financing. 

The Potential of AI
The potential of artificial intelligence (AI) to transform the hospitality industry was widely discussed at IHIF 2023. Participants delved into the various applications of AI, and how it could be leveraged to address the biggest challenges in the industry. Reducing the impact of mundane tasks on hospitality employees would likely increase employee retention. AI could also help with elements of the customer journey that are not considered to be drivers of delight, such as cleaning rooms, allowing the potentially reduced workforce to concentrate on ‘value-adding’ activities  The event showcased pilot projects and initiatives that leverage AI technologies, such as chatbots for personalised guest interactions, smart room controls for enhanced comfort and convenience, and AI-powered data analytics for market trend analysis and predictive modelling. While AI is still in its early stages, industry leaders expressed optimism about its ability to revolutionise how hotels operate and deliver exceptional guest experiences. 

 Conclusion
IHIF 2023 provided a platform for industry professionals to gain valuable insights into the current state and future direction of the hospitality industry. The event emphasised the need for bold strategies and innovative approaches to address challenges such as the Battle for Retention, the evolving demands of luxury travellers, the mainstream adoption of ESG practices, the subdued hotel transaction market, financing challenges, and the future potential of AI. As the industry continues to evolve and build resilience, a forward-thinking mindset will be crucial to thrive in a rapidly changing landscape. 

If you would like to discuss any of the topics raised in this article or would like to chat about your people strategy, then please get in touch. 

Dan Akhtar, Managing Director of HPG Advisory Services +44 20 8600 1166 / +44 7808 157796 / dan@hpgsearch.com 

Is Hospitality really the most stressful industry in the UK?

April is Stress Awareness Month, and after a number of publications last year reported that 57% of hospitality employees regularly experience high levels of stress, we want to ask if hospitality really is the most stressful industry in the UK? 

The most stressful industry in the UK? 

In July last year, a report from addiction and rehab specialist Delamere, on the toxicity of the hustle culture, gave a breakdown on stress in various industries. This report was picked up in a number of other articles at the time, and presented hospitality as the most stressful industry in the UK. According to the report, 57.1% of “Accommodation and Food Service” workers reported poor mental health, more than Health and Social Care and Manufacturing which rounded out the top three places. The data to back this up were attributed to Lifeworks’ monthly Mental Health Index. These figures tend to vary by month and while Hospitality is no longer considered the worst offender in terms of workplace stress, it still rates consistently low in areas such as Average Hours Worked and Work-Life Balance.  

The impact of stress on retention rates 

Long Hours and Work-Life Balance, contribute highly towards levels of stress, which can eventually lead to burnout, especially if the level of commitment to the business and its culture begins to wane. Inevitable this can lead to reduced productivity and employee retention levels.  

Last year, we published The Battle for Retention which looked at a number of other factors that can affect employee turnover. 

Advice on how to tackle stress in the workplace consistently revolves around how to spot it in yourself, and in your employees. As individuals, we all have a responsibility to ourselves to recognise when we are working too hard or neglecting our personal commitments. Hospitality Action is a charity that supports hospitality employees both inside and outside of the workplace. In their Advice Hub, they share expert advice and information on how to get further support on a range of issues, including Stress.  

Signs of stress can include: 

  •  Difficulty sleeping 
  • Feeling irritated with family, friends or co-workers 
  • Drinking more than usual 
  • Struggling with work deadlines 
  • Feeling isolated and lonely 
  • Physical symptoms such as: panic attacks, headaches, chest pains, indigestion, dizziness, nausea, sweating, breathing problems 

Mental health charity Mind recommends some ways to manage it including: 

  •  Identify your triggers – Try to prepare for stress by recognising what sets it off 
  • Organise your time – Make a list of your tasks and approach them in order of urgency 
  • Be clear about your limits – While it isn’t always possible to say no to things, let people know if you don’t have the capacity to fulfil their demands 
  • Try to take a short break – it may seem counter-intuitive to take a break when you are stressed but if you can allow yourself one, this can help how you feel 
  • Develop interests and hobbies – Outside of work, try to make time for what you enjoy to take you away from stress 
  • Get enough sleep 
  • Stay physically active 
  • Eat a balanced diet 
  • Spend time in nature 
  • Build a support network – having friends and family, or finding support at work to talk through why you feel stressed can make a big difference 

Employers also have a duty to instill a workplace culture that can help spot the signs of stress and empower them to engage with employees on a more personal level, especially if they are seeing symptoms of stress in the team or in individuals. According to the Health and Safety Executive, signs of stress in a team can include: 

  •  Increase in arguments amongst staff 
  • Higher staff turnover 
  • More reports of stress 
  • More sickness absence 
  • Decreased performance 
  • More complaints and grievances   

 In individuals, leaders may notice a change in the way people act or feel, such as: 

  •  Taking more time off 
  • Arriving for work later 
  • Being more twitchy or nervous 
  • Mood swings 
  • Being withdrawn 
  • A loss of motivation, commitment and confidence 
  • Increased emotional reactions – being more tearful, sensitive or aggressive 

In addition to the free support for hospitality employees, Hospitality Action also offers a number of support packages including Stress and Resilience Training, designed to bolster the resilience and wellbeing of your employees. 

If you would like support with your people strategy in 2023, Hospitality People Group are here for you. With a superb track record in finding the right people for the right role, we have long standing relationships with clients and candidates and we can help guide you through challenging and sometimes stressful times.  

If you would like to chat about your people strategy, please contact us on +44 20 8600 1166.  

 

UK and European Hotel Investment Outlook for 2023

Our Hospitality People Group Advisory Services team, Dan Akhtar and Mara Cattaneo, will be attending the upcoming International Hotel Investment Forum (IHIF) in Berlin this May.  

Ahead of this global forum, we explore what the current trends are in UK and European Hotel Investment. 

Firstly, let’s look back on 2022. 

2022 – A tale of two halves 

In our UK Hotel Investment Trends – Summer Update, we explored how the UK had seen a surge in capital investment in the first half of 2022. According to Knight Frank 68% of total transactions in 2022 occurred in the first six months of the year. The easing of travel restrictions in 2021 helped drive optimism in the latter part of 2021 and this enthusiasm carried through to boost the numbers in early 2022.  

However, the war in Ukraine, sky-rocketing inflation, compounded by a disastrous mini- budget late in the year, quickly turned this optimism into caution. As a result, the UK Hotel Investment market saw a final total of approximately £3B in transactions, about 30% down on the previous 5 year average.  

While the UK remains the largest investment market in Europe, the gap has narrowed between the UK and other competing markets such as Spain (£2.3B), France (£2.0B) and Germany (£1.6B) coming in second, third and fourth respectively. 

Although investor enthusiasm was hindered by the macroeconomic events that peppered the second half of 2022, they will have been equally assured by the industry’s financial performance. Hotels enjoyed a much better than expected year in 2022, as the pent up demand for travel and hospitality drove ADR back up close to pre-pandemic levels, earlier than previously predicted. 

How do we expect the hospitality sector to perform in 2023? 

While the easing of that post-pandemic, pent-up demand and the cost of living crisis continue to promote caution, operators are being challenged to carefully balance the business in order to protect profit. The recruitment challenges faced by the industry have certainly helped reduce immediate costs, but we are continuing to see the reputation of the industry being damaged. Glassdoor published their Top 50 list of employers for 2023, and for the 4th year in a row, the number of hospitality companies on that list has dropped, with Dishoom the only representative left in that top 50 list.  

Interestingly, one hospitality business has suggested that the hospitality industry itself is responsible for shifting the pessimistic narrative that took place during the pandemic. Wyndham Hotels and Resorts suggests that we have much to learn from those missteps. Many people thought that the future of corporate travel and buffet breakfasts were doomed and this pessimism may have prevented the industry preparing for and reacting better to the travel chaos last year that led to flight cancellations and airport shutdowns. This experience was something that will live long in the memory for customers who may think twice about traveling with those airlines again and the employees who may now have already reconsidered their career paths. 

Our team at FM Recruitment recently explored how operators are trying to promote a hospitality culture that focuses on retention ahead of recruitment. 

Resilience 

Hospitality has always shown resilience and the pandemic proved that it is also an industry that can be hugely creative when faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges.The businesses that can continue to flex and adapt their costs, if and when when revenues drop, and demonstrate a people culture that allows them to scale back up with a full complement of experienced, well-trained employees, will prove to be extremely attractive to investors. These businesses are more likely to be able to inspire exceptional guest experiences at full capacity and therefore reap the financial rewards at peak times. These same investors are thought to have the funds available and will be eager to step back into this market, but will be extra careful to ensure great value and resilience is factored in with the continuing expectation of recession ahead. 

An expected an upturn in investment levels  

Henry Jackson, partner at Knight Frank, said: “While no hotel business is immune to the effects of an economic downturn, and while profit margins are likely to be squeezed in the short-term, operationally the sector has continued its recovery and an upturn in investment levels for 2023 is anticipated. We have seen an uptick in investor activity at the end of 2022 and purchasers who are proactively seeking out opportunities now are well placed to move quickly when new stock becomes available. Investors are showing renewed signs of confidence in the London hotel market, with overseas purchasers benefitting from currency plays. 

Once the economic picture is clearer and the availability of debt recalibrates, we expect transactional activity during 2023 to rebound at a more buoyant pace, exceeding 2022 levels. With hotel property offering value and resilience relative to other real estate asset classes, a wide range of investor types will seek to deploy capital into the sector.” 

Speaking to Hospitality Investor, Chris Brassington, Senior Director of Fund Management at Invesco commented that “we fully expect to make additional investments with the aim of creating further value. Our intent is to create investments that have potential to deliver long-term compound growth above the market.” 

HPG Advisory Services 

If you would like to discuss any of these topics further, and examine how they might apply to your business or your investment portfolio, then please get in touch.  

We have exceptional industry relationships and proven successes with operators, developers and investors in the hotel, and hospitality sectors across the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. 

Our services include executive search, human capital architecture, talent management consultancy, behavioural profiling and a range of human capital services tailored to meet the specific challenges of each of our clients. 

We are proud to have delivered some of the industry’s most talented leaders into key appointments. If you’re looking to build, strengthen or diversify a role, a team or your entire business, please contact us today. 

Dan Akhtar, Managing Director of HPG Advisory Services +44 20 8600 1166 / +44 7808 157796 / dan@hpgsearch.com 

 

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